Categories

USCG Eagle  

Showing 1 - 6 of 6 items
USCG Eagle

As one of three sailing training ships, built in pre-World War II Germany, the USCG Eagle began her legendary career at sea as the SSS Horst Wessel. Designed by John Stanley as a Gorch Fock class cutter, a three-masted sailing barque, the ship or “Schiff” had its keel laid on February 15, 1936. Known then as ship number 508, she was launched on June 13 of that year, completed on September 16, and was commissioned the following day. Present at the launch and christening were Adolf Hitler and the Nazi politician Rudolph Hess, spectators for the ship named after Nazi party member Horst Wessel who wrote the music used in the German national anthem. 
Constructed by the historic Blohm and Voss Shipyards, which had been building ships since 1877, the SSS Horst Wessel emerged at 295 feet long, weighing 1824 tons. Powered by engine and sail she operated with three masts, the main and fore masts reaching 148 feet and the mizzenmast reaching 132 feet, and a 1,000 horsepower diesel engine. With a range of approximately 5,500 nautical miles and a top speed of 17 knots, she was a spry cutter designed for speed and agility. Two full length decks and one lower platform deck were all crafted from solid steel, with a hull that was four-tenths of inch-thick. For the quarterdeck and forecastle, steel was overlaid with rich teak, three inches thick, for both strength and classic aesthetics.